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“Tsunami”

At the Cerritos Civic Center

Updated December 23, 2009

Tsunami

Mark Leichliter
Born 1966, Loveland, Colorado

“Tsunami,” 2001
Bronze and Stainless Steel, Fountain
10 foot diameter

Mark Leichliter's sculpture “Tsunami” is displayed in the park-like Cerritos Civic Center in the area south of the Cerritos Library. The sculpture depicts a seismic sea wave and is constructed of two elements: a massive (8 foot diameter, 1 inch thick) disk of stainless steel and two cast bronze wave shapes.  The stainless steel disk represents the earth's tectonic plates.  A bubbling fountain at the base of the piece conceals the sculpture's secure anchoring system and gives “Tsunami ” the appearance of being suspended on water. 

Leichliter's inspiration for “Tsunami” was humanity's ability to overcome hardships, including the destruction caused by seismic sea waves.  The conical base has a fissure-shaped trough filled with flowing water.  This element divides the space around the sculpture, creating a focal point of the cascading water that serves as a symbol for the human process of healing and transcending the tragedy of natural disasters.

Leichliter's involvement with artwork began in 1988 when he became the production manager, welder and enlargement assistant for Dan Ostermiller, an internationally renown sculptor.  In 1990, Leichliter apprenticed under Swedish sculptor Kent Ullberg, serving as production manager and specializing in monumental sculpture.  Leichliter began sculpting full-time when he completed his apprenticeship in 1994.

In addition to regularly presenting his work in exhibitions, Leichliter has completed the following commissions:  “Solar Sails” for the City of Paramount, California; “Inner Dance” for Auto Nation, Cerritos; “Spirit of Troy” for the Toal/Chambers Collection, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; “Haiku” for the Michael Harkey Collection, Edmond, Oklahoma; “Caballo” for American Stores Headquarters, Salt Lake City, Utah and “Tropism” for a private collector.

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